Jean Francois le Gall

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2019

Jean-François Le Gall has made several deep and elegant contributions to the theory of stochastic processes. His work on the fine properties of Brownian motions solved many difficult problems, such as the characterization of sets visited multiple times and the behavior of the volume of its neighborhood – the Brownian sausage. Le Gall made groundbreaking advances in the theory of branching processes, which arise in many applications. In particular, his introduction of the Brownian snake and his studies of its properties revolutionized the theory of super-processes – generalizations of Markov processes to an evolving cloud of dying and splitting particles. He then used some of these tools for achieving a spectacular breakthrough in the mathematical understanding of 2D quantum gravity. Le Gall established the convergence of uniform planar maps to a canonical random metric object, the Brownian map, and showed that it almost surely has Hausdorff dimension 4 and is homeomorphic to the 2-spher

Mathematics

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Jean Francois le Gall

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2019

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Gregory Lawler

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2019

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Vladimir Drinfeld

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2018

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Alexander Beilinson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2018

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Richard Schoen

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2017

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Charles Fefferman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2017

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

James G. Arthur

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2015

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Peter Sarnak

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2014

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Michael Artin

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2013

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

George D. Mostow

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2013

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Michael Aschbacher

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2012

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Luis Caffarelli

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2012

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Shing-Tung Yau

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2010

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Dennis Sullivan

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2010

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Pierre R. Deligne

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Phillip A. Griffiths

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

David B. Mumford

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Harry Furstenberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2006

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Stephen Smale

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2006

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Gregory A. Margulis

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2005

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Sergei P. Novikov

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2005

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Mikio Sato

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2002

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

John T. Tate

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2002

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Vladimir I. Arnold

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2001

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Saharon Shelah

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2001

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Raoul Bott

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2000

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jean-Pierre Serre

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2000

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Laszlo Lovash

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1999

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Elias M. Stein

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1999

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Yakov G. Sinai

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1996

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Joseph B. Keller

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1996

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Robert P. Langlands

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1995

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Andrew J. Wiles

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1995

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jurgen K. Moser

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1994

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Mikhael Gromov

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1993

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jacques Tits

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1993

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Lennart A. E. Carleson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1992

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

John G. Thompson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1992

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Ilya Piatetski-Shapiro

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1990

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Ennio De Giorgi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1990

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

John W. Milnor

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1989

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Alberto P. Calderon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1989

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Lars Hormander

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathemstics 1988

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Friedrich Hirzebruch

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1988

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Peter D.Lax

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1987

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Kiyoshi Ito

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1987

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Samuel Elienberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1986

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Atle Selberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1986

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Kunihiko Kodaira

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1984

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Hans Lewy

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1984

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Shiing S.Chern

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1983

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Paul Erdos

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1983

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Mark G.Krein

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1982

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Hassler Whitney

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1982

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Oscar Zariski

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1981

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Lars V.Ahlfors

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1981

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Henry Cartan

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1980

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Andrei N.Kolmogorov

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1980

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jean Leray

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1979

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Andre Well

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1979

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Izrali M.Gelfand

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1978

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Carl S. Siegel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1978

 

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to:

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

Izrael M. Gelfand
Moscow State University
Moscow, U.S.S.R.

for his work on functional analysis, group representation, and for his seminal contributions to many areas of mathematics and its applications,

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.